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1914 World Series Game 1 Shibe Park PSA "Authentic" Ticket Stub - None Graded Higher

Lot Number 832

Quantity: Bid Starts: 02/03/2014 12:00:00 
Bid Open: 1500.00  Bid Ends: 02/13/2014 22:00:00 
Bid Count: Overtime: 30 Minutes
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Description

Without a comfortable “home” in Boston or in the clubhouse accommodations offered at Philadelphia’s Shibe Park, the Braves entered the 1914 World Series at an overwhelming disadvantage. But long odds were hardly daunting to this, a club that spent the majority of the season in the basement and was as much as 15 games off the pace as late as July 5. Skipper George Stallings’ “Miracle” roster was just that, shunning the Philadelphia clubhouse in favor of the facilities five blocks east at the deserted Baker Bowl, and proceeded to author the first sweep in World Series annals over the highly touted Athletics. Encapsulated and assessed “Authentic” by PSA, this ticket stub was issued at Shibe Park for the opener of that unforgettable Fall Classic. Decidedly scarce as October souvenirs go, this priceless voucher is one of five deemed “Authentic” by PSA, with none graded higher. Consistent with the underdog theme endured by the Braves all year, Game 1 saw Fordham University product and spitballer Dick Rudolph fan eight and limit the hosts to just five hits in a 7-1 Braves victory. The loss, meanwhile, came at the expense of Hall of Famer Chief Bender.

The rare and colorful voucher features printed seating/event details, as well as the facsimile signature of Athletics fixture Connie Mack (signed “C. McGillicuddy”). Separated evenly along the perforation (likely by an usher upon admission that day), the ticket includes both parts, which have been re-attached. Vibrant hues and a clean reverse are just part of the fare on this historic October heirloom.

As for the Braves “displaced” dilemma, they had left their South End Grounds home in August and, still awaiting construction of Braves Field, were forced to rent Fenway Park. Regarding Stallings’ decision to utilize the Baker Bowl visitors clubhouse rather than the on-site facilities at Shibe Park, legend has it that the Braves resented Philadelphia’s status as overwhelming favorites and suspected that their clubhouse might be “sabotaged.”

 
 
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